OLIVELEAF WEBSITE || UMILTA WEBSITE || OLIVELEAF WEBSITE || JULIAN OF NORWICH, TEXT AND CONTEXTS, WEBSITE || BIRGITTA OF SWEDEN, REVELATIONES, WEBSITE || CATALOGUE AND PORTFOLIO (HANDCRAFTS, BOOKS ) || BOOK REVIEWS || BIBLIOGRAPHY || FLORIN WEBSITE  1997-2017 JULIA BOLTON HOLLOWAY



WEAVING WEBSITES



here are two ways to weave a website. The easy one is a Web log. My own at http://piazzaledonatello.blogspot.com, suggested to me at St Petersburg's UNESCO conference a year ago on culture and computers, has a built-in programme that is largely automatic, much easier than the traditional web essay crafting. It can also link easily to a petition site, as mine does, where we have now more than 5000 signatures, on the web and physically here in the English Cemetery, to save it as a World Monument.

Weblogs are far more dynamic and trendy, but too easy for my tastes!

Ten years ago I began weaving webs, Timothy Thompson at Syracuse University in Florence teaching me html, Otfried Lieberknecht in Berlin loaning me webspace, Tony St Quintin being my consultant. Because I work with medieval manuscripts and their memory systems in colour and images I chose to use their wisdom on the web rather than reinvent the wheel, using their alternating reds and blues for later medieval texts, their reds and greens for the earlier ones. Then I acquired a set of capitals in reds and blues, which I now need to expand into greens and perhaps darker blues, for a section of this umilta website is on trauma healing with the theme of olive leaves.


The splendid Italian colleague (see also his newsletter), who did the first two alphabets, has now done one in green:


At first I used straight - and complicated - html. Then Tony St Quintin downloaded Netscape Navigator 4 for me which had an excellent web composer on it. I used that long after the programme became totally obsolete. Finally I was blocked from access to it. So recently I have rediscovered it, and it is even better than ever before, on Mozilla, now called 'Sea Monkey', which you can download for free. On 'File' in 'Sea Monkey', click on 'edit', then on 'new', then on 'composer page', and you are ready to weave your website.

Begin with your title in capitals, enlarge and bold these, and colour them. They look terrible in black and white!

WEAVING WEBSITES

WEAVING WEBSITES


Next, switch back from 'caps lock' to normal and launch into the body of your text. You can use black for this but I find more pleasing the grey that is #666666.

Colour on the Web is free! In printed books it was too costly. But the scribes and illuminators of medieval manuscripts knew that it was ideal for making a text memorable to its reader. So can we. Just define a letter, a word, a paragran, then click on the colour desired.

As your website grows create an index to run along the top and bottom of your pages which can be copy-pasted. Because these titles refer to other web pages hyptertext their links by defining the word, clicking on 'link', then accepting it. .html=hypertext markup language and it will be your most useful tool in webcrafting between multiple essays.

OLIVELEAF WEBSITE || UMILTA WEBSITE || OLIVELEAF WEBSITE || JULIAN OF NORWICH, TEXT AND CONTEXTS, WEBSITE || BIRGITTA OF SWEDEN, REVELATIONES, WEBSITE || CATALOGUE AND PORTFOLIO (HANDCRAFTS, BOOKS ) || BOOK REVIEWS || BIBLIOGRAPHY || FLORIN WEBSITE  1997-2007 JULIA BOLTON HOLLOWAY

To see what html looks like, in 'Edit', go to 'View', then to 'HTML Source'
In html the above hyperlinked index looks like:


<br>
</big><font color="#006600"><font size="-1">OLIVELEAF WEBSITE</font></font><font
color="#006600"><font size="-1"><font face="Times New Roman,Times"> ||
</font></font></font><font color="#006600"><font size="-1"><a
href="index.html">UMILTA
WEBSITE</a> || <a href="oliveleaf.html">OLIVELEAF
WEBSITE</a> || <a href="julian.html">JULIAN
OF NORWICH, TEXT AND CONTEXTS, WEBSITE</a> || <a href="birgitta.html">BIRGITTA
OF SWEDEN, <i>REVELATIONES</i>, WEBSITE</a> || <font
face="Times New Roman,Times"><a href="shop.html">CATALOGUE
AND PORTFOLIO (HANDCRAFTS, BOOKS )</a> ||
<a href="review.html">BOOK REVIEWS</a>
|| <a href="bibliogr.html">BIBLIOGRAPHY</a>
||</font> <a href="http://www.florin.ms/">FLORIN
WEBSITE</a>&nbsp; &copy;1997-2006 <a href="mailto:juliana@tin.it">JULIA
BOLTON
HOLLOWAY</a></font></font><br>
<big style="color: rgb(102, 102, 102);"><br>

What makes the links work. for instance to oliveleaf.html are the codes
  <a href="oliveleaf.html"> before and </a> after the reference terms, the </a> closing the code.

One can do the same with other actions such as
<blink>blink</blink>, the /slash indicating the end of the action in this html coding, which functions much like algebra, where everything must mirror going out of the equation what was going on going into it.

Next go into 'view', click on 'html source' where you will see:

<html>
<head>
<meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
http-equiv="content-type">
<title>weaveweb</title>
<meta content="Julia Bolton Holloway" name="author">
</head>
<body>

and add something like the following:

<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type"
content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<meta name="GENERATOR"
content="Mozilla/4.72 [en] (Windows NT 5.0; I) [Netscape]">
<meta name="revisit=after" content="15 days">
<meta name="ROBOTS" content="ALL">
<meta name="description"
content="crafting websites, weblogs">
<meta name="keywords"
content="Weave, build, create, website, websites, webmaster, webmistress, weblog, html, images, background, counters, flags, Philip Roughton, Bob King, Timothy Thompson, Tony St Quintin, Otfried Lieberknecht">
<title>Weaving Websites</title>
</head>
<body
style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); background-image: url(cellbkgd.jpg);">

Then click back into 'normal' on the 'view' or 'save' in 'file'. And these will disappear. They are your metatags, operating behind the scenes, giving shape to your web essay and also giving it publicity on the web, saying how it presents itself to spiders and their search engines. In a sense this essay is the metatag to this website, its 'behind the works', like the man behind the machine who is revealed in 'The Wizard of Oz' as creating the whole fantasy. It gives the background that appears behind the text, here of Julian in her cell in Norwich.


Now you need webspace with your own URL. Mine is through Easyspace http://www.easyspace.com in Scotland. And an FTP (file transfer protocol) programme. Mine was Cute FTP www.cuteftp.com/ . Now I prefer Filezilla, which is free. Sea Monkey with the website composer in edit mode is also free, downloaded from http://www.seamonkey-project.org/ But one does have to pay for webspace free from advertising.

The background image and the capitals need to be uploaded to the website along with the text for these effects to work there. Remember the code <body> now needs to be
<body
style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); background-image: url(cellbkgd.jpg);">

Finally images. I found better than a scanner is a good digital camera. If you are taking pictures from old photographs and books then you need a trestle such as you can buy from IKEA for making a table out of two trestles and a board. Place a small board across the bottom of the trestle, the camera on the top and shoot. If the object you are photographing is glossy, like a photograph, then take its digital picture with the flash disabled, placing your apparatus in front of a window, in natural light but not sunlight. The web can cope with images in jpg and gif, not tiff.

I could not show the placement of the camera in the image below because I was using it! It is held steady along the top bar. A picture taken by hand-held camera is likely to be blurry because the hand shakes and moves a bit. The trestle doesn't. I have even taught this cheap method to professional archivists who have gone on then to digitize manuscripts at no cost.




This is a digital photograph of our olive trees in tubs outside of our library in Florence, before entering the 'English' Cemetery. Its name is 'donatellolive2.jpg'. It can be copied by clicking on it, then pasted elsewhere - if you are in 'edit', rather than in 'browse' mode. If you are in 'browse', then you will need to right click with your mouse on it and 'save image as' to a file in your computer. Once you have the Sea Monkey composer you can learn through using 'edit' and 'view' and 'html source' even how other web sites work.



I banish from my website frames, java script, counters and flags. Java script because people in the Third World, in monasteries, etc., lacking access to newer programmes, cannot access web pages with it. Not using frames means one can be archived by the Way Back Machine. (Look for this on Google.) Rather than a counter, I would find out that thousands of people visit my websites from asking Easyspace to send me in an e-mail daily the hits these essays have. Or I looked them up on Alexa. Or relied on the Google page ranking. But now, best of all, is to subscribe to Google Analytics, which even gives a global map on which you can see all the visits from all over the world, breaking these down into cities, etc. There is only one flag I permit, that of the Rom, a people with no army, no frontiers:





This is how this image looks in html:

<br>
<br>
<br>
<center>
<p><img src="romwave.gif"
tppabs="http://www.dag.it/franzese/romwave.gif" height="150"
width="211"></p>
</center>
<br>
<br>
<br>

Six years ago we created a website for the Urban Development Project at All Saints Cathedral in Nairobi. It became too clunky, with tiny images because of very little electricity for running computers in Nairobi. But I would recommend for charity work these days a blog, rather than a web page. Or at least each referring to the other. See for instance ours to save the 'English' Cemetery in Florence, http://piazzaledonatello.blogspot.com Both web pages and blogs can benefit from a PayPal button, as well.

While, as your web site grows larger and larger, an internal Google search button specific to your site can be very helpful.
Google
Search WWW Search www.umilta.net


Diderot and D'Alembert in their Encyclopedie unlocked all the secrets of the trades. From their volumes you can study how to marble paper, using Irish seaweed as base upon which to sprinkle the colours to each of which is added a drop of oxgall,

 

and to bind books by hand, such as the one above on the trestle. I prefer to combine real books with e-books, handcrafts with webpages. See http://www.umilta.net/cradle.html.  For webcrafting your needs are simple, a computer, a digital camera, a trestle, webspace, an ftp programme and a web composer. The web composer is free, the trestle almost so. And upon your ingenuity no price can be set.

Remember that Mary Somerville taught mathematics to Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron's daughter, who, with Charles Babbage, then invented the computer, by using cards like those for Jacquard looms for weaving brocaded cloth. Thus women can be web weavers as well as men, together as webmasters and webmistresses.

    

See museum and puntoantico for an explanation of the woven linen below:



I bought in Florence's Straw Market this hand-loomed linen which comes from Farfa Sabina where they still weave designs that go back millennia, to Constantinople on the Bosporus and to the land of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, the cradle of our civilization from whence derived our alphabet and our designs. The hand-painted medieval and Renaissance majolica shards are those we find in our Cemetery in Florence.

You have the whole world - without any frontiers - to play with on the World Wide Web, just as did motifs in embroidery and in sculpture and in manuscript marginalia sweep across the globe being shared and appreciated by far-flung cultures. My essays on the Belgian Godfriend Jan van Ruusbroec caused the President of Beijing's Global Village to visit me in Florence where we spoke together for hours on culture and ecology, before she and her teenage daughter journeyed on to Groenendaal.

Bless you.

Earth First Seen From Space


OLIVELEAF WEBSITE || UMILTA WEBSITE || OLIVELEAF WEBSITE || JULIAN OF NORWICH, TEXT AND CONTEXTS, WEBSITE || BIRGITTA OF SWEDEN, REVELATIONES, WEBSITE || CATALOGUE AND PORTFOLIO (HANDCRAFTS, BOOKS ) || BOOK REVIEWS || BIBLIOGRAPHY || FLORIN WEBSITE  1997-2017 JULIA BOLTON HOLLOWAY